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across north africa beginning with egypt, i've asked our speakers to limit the remarks to roughly seven minutes in order to reserve plenty of time for your questions and answers. dr. anthony and the organizers as always have provided with a series of thought-provoking questions, and as with previous panels, question cards we available to you. so first, i'd like to call on karim who is a visiting professor, and served as a great egyptian diplomat with direct experience in egypt's diplomacy towards middle east regional security, arms control and nonproliferation issues. is also a veteran of the egyptian information and political military affairs office here in washington. so it offers a unique insight into the delicate relationship new leaders find themselves maneuvering in. mr. haggag, thank you. >> thank you, and i'd like to thank the council for this opportunity. it's a pleasure to be here with you today. i'd like to focus my remarks on foreign policy, particularly the challenges facing the new egyptian government in the foreign policy and region security realm, but i can set the conce
headquarters in atlanta, this is early start weekend. egypt on edge. thousands of furious protesters packed tahrir square after their new president makes a bold move for unprecedented power. >> dramatic new video this morning. look at this. a gas explosion shreds a strip club. >> and you drove cliff to attempt suicide? >> how was i to know he was going to do a dumb thing like that? >> and tv's original bad boy, hollywood reacting to the death of "dallas" star larry hagman. it is saturday, november 24th. i'm randi kaye. >> i'm victor blackwell. thank you for starting your morning with us. >> we begin in tahrir square this morning where hundreds of protesters have been arrested during anti-government dmem k. demonstrations angry with their president over his new power grab. >> opposition leaders say he is now more powerful than former president hosni mubarak ever was. this week, leaders around the world praised him for brokering a cease fire between israel and hamas. . >> more now on his new powers and the anger it spurred. >> if anyone thought egyptians were tired or weary of protesting afte
'll also visit egypt and the west bank city of ramallah. and while the two sides are trading cease-fire proposals, israel's ambassador tells erin burnett his country is ready to launch a full-scale ground invasion. we talk to our reporter in phnom penh. she's been following the secretary of state. she departed just a few minutes ing aheaded to the middle east. good morning, jessica. what can you tell us about the secretary of state's mission? >> reporter: hi, john. good morning. the secretary of state is headed now to israel, ramallah and egypt to see if she can work with those three partners to try -- well, not partners -- but those three interests to see if she can help fashion some sort of a cease-fire. her trip was announced here in cambodia by a white house official, ben rhodes, with the national security council. and he made it very clear that in the white house's view, the primary onus is on hamas to take the first step in starting this truce by stopping their rocket fire into israel. listen to what he had to say. >> the bottom line still remains that hamas has to stop this
of those hit. the international community wants egypt to use its influence to help broker rate peace deal. on a visit to gaza are, of the egyptian and prime minister announced the is really assaults like to buy the hamas leader. >> post-revolutionary egypt, will make every effort to stop these attacks and to ensure the rights of the palestinian people. >> israel says they will halt their attacks only will they stop firing rockets out their people. coming within striking distance of tel aviv and jerusalem, they seem unlikely to opt for restraint. >> with the latest? >> we understand from reports in gaza that there are more airstrikes and there was another step by the military launching in the arms birds of jerusalem. this is about 20 kilometers south of jerusalem. nobody was injured as this exploded and the results of a speech by president of boss in which he appeared to the egyptians to help a low lilly fighting. he also tried to speak for all the palestinians. also on the political efforts, they will be meeting tonight to discuss for the developments and talk about the tunisian foreign m
. the launch pad for peace may be in cairo. in the last 24 hours egypt has been mediating high-stakes discussions between israeli and hamas leaders. speaking today egyptian prime minister hish m kandil said -- in gaza, palestinian medical officials report 95 people have been killed in gaza including 23 children. for the second straight day, israel bombed a building housing local and international media. the target of the attack was a commanding member of an islamic jihad group who also had an apartment in the building. meanwhile, hamas continues to send rockets deep into israel. last night, israel's iron dome intercepted two rockets headed for tel aviv. yesterday, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu had tough talks on twitter writing we are exacting a heavy price from hamas and the terrorist organizations. the idf is prepared for a significant expansion of its operation. in a press gaggle on route to cambodia this morning, deputy national security adviser ben rhodes says the white house's goal is to have nations with influence in the region speak for deescalation. speakin
of government and that our impression is that the presidency, the foreign ministry, the other agencies of egypt have worked together cohesively with in relation to hamas and to israel to try to bring about a ceasefire. so we have to support their efforts. >> dr. julian lewis. >> does the foreign secretary agree that the greater stride towards peace was when president sadat signed the treaty between egypt and israel, and does he, therefore, share my disappointment of the statement recently by president morrissey of -- morsi of egypt that the president situation is an act of aggression solely by the israelis? >> well, while that statement is different from what he or i might say about the origins of this, nevertheless, i hope my honorable friend will bear in mind the answer i gave to the previous question about the very constructive role being played by egypt. my experience and the prime minister's experience in meeting president morsi is that he wants a peaceful future for his country, he has not turned against the peace treaty with israel. he knows the importance of now building up the economy
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
. >>> and now to egypt. demonstrators there have taken to the streets in cairo to protest against president mohamed morsi. morsi expanded his powers this week, and that means no one can challenge his decisions. they can't be overturned. that's led to anger among the people and some of the judges. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. >> reporter: thanks have calmed down considerably in cairo's tahrir square. still demonstrators out in tahrir, especially those who pitched tents overnight but the numbers not as what we saw on friday, friday one of the most intense and violent days of demonstrations that we've seen since mr. morsi, the egyptian president took office back in june. more than 140 people injured throughout egypt, according to the health ministry, in clashes between protesters and police. a little under 40 people injured in kay row. several with gunshot wounds. also, more than 200 people arrested and many on charges of thuggery and destroying public property. those arrested seem to be younger men who are out looking for trouble, but certainly thousands showed up to express wha
. they are interesting. see the list of countries that it was really at it in. iran, syria, lebanon, saudi arabia, egypt. sometimes it is called viper. a little bit confusing because they often times see things get kind of melted into each other. like you know, a very interesting whole incident. the size and sophistication of this was so great that i think the conclusion is clear that it was a government that was doing this. it is just unfathomable that it could then a smaller kind of scale operation. i think one of my colleagues is going to talk about estonia a little bit more, too. in 2007, estonia removed a statue, a soviet era statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's
more dead bodies came into the hospital as he was there. >> israel's operation was a disaster. egypt cannot remain silent. >> israeli air strikes are ongoing. israel says in response to continued palestinian rocket fire. there's no end to the violence in sight. jon tumilson, bbc news, gaza. -- jon donnison reporting. >> despite hopes that there might be a brief cease-fire from the egyptian prime minister when he came to visit today, but did not happen. >> no. there was meant to be a three- hour truce. both sides accuse the other of breaking that. hamas rockets being fired towards southern israel and militants in gaza say that israel launched attacks against the gaza, killing at least two civilians. there was evidence this morning in gaza city of israeli air strikes. any hopes of a long-term cease- fire hearour division. we have witnessed a large rockets being fired within the last hour towards tel aviv. we believe one of the rockets landed just short of tel aviv in an open area. i cannot see that israel would tolerate any long-range rockets being fired towards one of its largest citi
're in "the situation room." >>> tensions heading toward a tipping point in egypt where thousands of mourners today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judici
in the middle east. riots breaking out in egypt after president morsi effectively declares himself a dictator. welcome to "america live", everyone. hope you had a nice thanksgiving. now back to the news. i'm megyn kelly. that press briefing, the very first before after the thanksgiving holidays. there is a lot to talk about. the middle east will be a hot topic. this is what it looked like over in cairo over the weekend while you were with your family probably not paying too much attention to the news. but, boy, things are unfolding there in a major way with thousands of angry demonstrators calling president morsi, the new pharaoh and raising questions about our relationship with what was once a critical ally in the region. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo where we've been watching the crowds get bigger and bigger in tahrir square. steve? >> reporter: megyn, it looks like president morsi is trying to give the appearance trying to find a way out of the situation, some sort of compromise from the firestorm he set off four days ago with a order basically says any decrease he issues are po
spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiative called teen cancer america. it aims to set up hospitals and medical centers in the strategic areas across the country. see their remarks live beginning at 1 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public atears. weak dies fee you are -- weekdays featuring live coverage of the senate and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> former national security adviser stephen hadley was among the speakers at a recent conference focusing on national security challenges facing the united states. he said the top priority should be getting
us back to the middle east that we used the to know the arabs and israelis going at it and egypt being -- [inaudible] but right before that iran saw its fortunes decline, its popularity in the arab streets declined because of the arab spring, and then the syrian situation introduced a very, very important element, almost sectarian element, that eroded iranian influence in the region and the projection of iranian power hit a brick wall with that. so all of this, of course, goes into the mix of what iran is thinking. and this is one of the reasons. this is a good time to start negotiating with iran as its reach in the middle east seems to be not what it used to be, it's not as soft power, superpower, nor is it a hard power superpower in the renal payoff the situation -- in the region because of the situation in lebanon and syria. p lebanon is really the coming disaster, and syria is the disaster that we're dealing with right now. so, of course, all of this will go on. and if i were american, i would say this is exactly the right time to go into this. the presidential elections are
a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his top advisors today, and he said he'll consider that, but first there needs to be a dialogue. let's take a listen to the advisor. >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make? >> this decision is up to the president. not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible -- >> we are ready for our dialogue. >> are you prepared to consider rescinding adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president. accepting it we may have some reservations, but as a whole, we must take a step forward, not two backward. mr. morsi
, china, south africa and egypt. >> i want a program that is more or less a mix of here and abroad. i did not want to do two consecutive years in germany, and i'm afraid i will never come back to egypt. >> the university wants students to go home when they graduate and contribute to their country's development. this didn't come from johannesburg to study water and engineering. she will be spending her second semester in berlin. >> i am looking forward to it. hopefully i come back in october. that should be really cool. i look forward to meeting new people in berlin in making new friends. >> many universities in germany can only dream of universities like these. it is the only institution of its kind in the world. >> we are traditionally an internationally oriented university, so it is a logical step to export our vision of education abroad. i think it will hugely boost our international reputation and the perception of our university abroad. >> the student dormitory is next to the campus. tuition is 5000 euros a semester. >> i miss my family, my mom, my dad, my sisters. but it is somethin
have come thick and fast. iran called the attacks organized terrorism. egypt's foreign minister called for a formal u.n. security council meeting to discuss the attacks. and said they must end. >> translator: egypt strongly condemns the israeli air strike in the gaza strip and the kellings of civilians and the assassination. we strongly condemn it. >> and wide gdemonstrations turned violent. in spain, riot police fired rubber bullets. and in lisbon, protesters tore down barricades lobbing rocks and bottles. workers also protested in greece, france and well engine against government policies that have driven up unemployment. the gdp is expected to sling by 0.2% in the third quarter pushing the bloc officially into recession territory. the eurozone downturn is taking its toll on germany. they had resilience tocrisis. economists are warning country could see a further contraction in the last three months of the year as dim prospects for the currency bloc continue to weigh on consumer and business sentiment. following this for us is still via ve still radio silva a vo [ silva a vod have a
, but we need more details of what is exactly means. the first point is that egypt is the guarantor of the cease-fire. >> let's talk about the role of egypt here. it has been a huge test of egyptian diplomacy and for its new president. is this a victory for him, would you say, or did hillary clinton's intervention make a big difference? >> no, i think it is certainly a victory. by the way, lots of praise from the americans for the mediating role of the egyptians. for now, if the ceasefire stands and will hold, which is of course still a question, it will be seen as a success story. >> thanks for that from cairo. all right, let's go straight over to gaza. what is the latest? is it quiet? >> it is relatively quiet, i would say. we still hear a lot of drums in the air. in the past hour, it brought some of rockets, but now at the moment, i would say it is quite -- in the past hour, a barrage of rockets, but now at the moment, i would say it is quiet. people still wonder if the cease-fire will be implemented. over the past few days, there was a lot of talk, and we do not see a lot of peo
and his entourage and his inner circle, thought that syria might weather the arab storm that had hit egypt and tunisia, yemen, bahrain and libya. he gave an interview in january to a good friends of mine, jay sol low moan, with "the wall street journal" where he said syria was immune from the arab spring. some of the mouthpieces for the regime in february and march were publishing articles in syrian forums that were supportive of the protesters in egypt and tunisia, and there was a contrast made that they authoritarian leaders who were lackeys of the united states and israel, were out of touch with the youth ask the populations in their countries, whereas the president of syria was a young 45 at the time. he was a computer nerd. he liked the technological toys of the west. he was in touch with the syrian population. he certainly was not a lackey of the united states, and israel. in fact he was supported of hezbollah, amass, iran, and other groups and states, that had a lot of street credibility in the arab world. so they thought it would pass them over. in fact i know that president bashar
from egypt in 30 ad. nearly every religion, islam, buddhism, hinduism they have the fascination with the apocalypse. christians prophesize about the end of time and the holy scripture. lauren green reports. ♪ 6. >> reporter: christians mark the end of time in the final chapter of the new testament the book of revelation. chapter 11 verse 18 reads, now is the time to destroy those who destroy the earth. >> book is not about destruction. it's not about the wrath of god. it is about consequences. >> reporter: mark translated the book from the original greek text. he collaborated with hollywood writer to publish a graphic novel to help readers visualize the final chapter. >> we are trying to get people to see the book of revelation in a new way, not just read it but see it. all we're trying to do is present it in the full message of hope in god and hope for the future. >>> how likely john would have been concerned about the end times? >> if he was the last 12 disciples of jesus, she church that is expecting the lord to come back but he hasn't yet. there is a yearning in the commun
gauze why and israel and playing out in egypt. bring us up to speed. the rebels made some advancements. >> the rebels have scored some successes. they have captured a couple of rather small but still significant military installations, one little air base, they got a tank out of it, they destroyed a couple of helicopters, destroyed another couple of tanks that was seen -- because it was very close to damascus, seen as a major victory for them. moreover, moreover they changed their strategy. their strategy of trying to go into a major city, take it, and hold it. and they get pulverized in bombing campaigns that took so much of a toll on the civilian population. going right after the military, the military centers in and doing so, they're gaining arms. and expertise. there are more people that are joining them, the syrian military still a formidable force and the rebels probably not a match for them toe to toe but gaining strength. >> we know the geography, turkey to the north, turkey considering putting missiles on the border now? >> they're asking nato to consider it. they're sending a
on the states because it's been a very fascinating story. egypt is still going through a revolution, halt asserted -- hasn't asserted itself, needs help from the rest of the world particularly economically. it can't be as assertive and play a role. iraq is not really fully integrated into the arab world left. what does that leave? syria is in trouble. that leaves the gulf cooperate council state led by saudi arabia. so what we have now is a coalition state, the gulf cooperation council around saudi arabia that invited two other states into the royal club, jordan and morocco, to broaden the gcc in exchange for economic and security cooperation going in different directions, and that is the coalition right now that is the powerful coalition in the arab world. and the states that are going through change are somewhat marginalized, there's no one else is so if you want to call that unity, go ahead. that's what we have. >> that's a problem. egypt will come back. >> it'll come back. >> and soon. >> and then in terms of identity politics, you get to a country like libya, you add the tribal -- >>
, who is egypt's first freely elected president is trying to establish a dictatorship. morsi is meeting today with the country's highest judicial authority in a bid to defuse this crisis. reza sayah is live in cairo. what's the situation right now? >> reporter: john, let's bring you up to speed. as we speak, egyptian president mohamed morsi meeting with egypt's top judges, seven of them representing the supreme judicial counsel. of course, the judges locking horns with mr. morsi right after one of his decrees essentially disabled them. so they're talking. we're going to see what the outcome of that meeting is. in the meantime, the leading factions, leading opposition factions continue to protest behind us in tahrir square. these factions that represent women's rights groups, youth groups, minorities, their position so far has been we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he reverses his decrees. we spoke to one of mr. morsi's top advisers earlier today. we asked him if that was a possibility. >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make? >> this decision is up to the president
, president mubarak, out of leadership in egypt, there was -- they were assisting in creating instability around our other ally israel, and that instability continues to grow. one of the things that was helpful from egypt while president mubarak was in charge, at least there was some effort to restrict the transfer of rockets into the gaza strip. so there were some tunnels that would be found, the tunnels had to be kept small so they were able to get smaller rockets into gaza. but now that there's a new regime, apparently the bigger rockets are getting in to gaza and they pose more and more of a threat as they continue to be fired into israel. the action is not only the fall of an ally, president mubarak, but the assistance in bringing to power in egypt the muslim brotherhood. they want to see israel gone and they would also not mind seing the united states gone. it's important when formulating foreign policy that the united states, particularly the obama administration, decide, are we going to be assisted with our own personal security issue here in the united states by the actions we ta
and the arabs going at it and egypt. but right before that iran saw its for turns decline. its popularity in the arab streets declined because of the arab spring, and then the syrian situation has introduced some very, very important elements, almost sectarian element that declined -- that eroded iranian influence in the region and the projection of the iranian power hit a brick wall with that. so all of this of course closed into the mix of what iran is thinking. and this is one of the reasons this is a good time to start negotiating with iran. as its reach in the middle east seems to be not what it used to be, are a superpower, nor is it a hard power superpower in the region because of the situation in lebanon and in syria. lebanon is really the coming disaster and syria is the disaster that we're dealing with right now. so of course all of this will go in and if i were american and while the american negotiators i would say, this is exactly the right time to go into this. the presidential elections are coming. but still as always -- we have to wait to see who he appoints as the point p
about egypt? could we see this president reached out to the president and talk about what is going on? >> the president, as you know, has broken no on numerous occasions with president -- has occasions mn numerous with numerousoris. -- with president morsi going forward. i do not have an agenda on what those conversations with look- alike. we have raised concerns. the state department put out a statement on this about the briefing. the state department have more information of this of a client how he has communicated those concerns. our interest is in the process, the transition to a democracy continuing in the development of a government that reflects the will of the egyptian people. we are working towards that. we believe it is in the interest of the american people and of the united states but also because it reflects the will and the interest of the egyptian people. >> democracy is in the process, but doesn't look like there is a transitioning to a dictatorship? >> important to take a step back. in november 2012, lookout -- look at how much has changed in that region of since late
is testing is real. israel is testing egypt. there is more uncertainty about israel and the end of -- the relationship with iran. what is hezbollah doing now that they are involved in their own fights inside syria? the opportunity for turkey to play a role right now. it just is the normans. this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i am reminded of bob dylan's favorite song. i propose we adopted as the anthem. there must be some way out of here. let's aim of for some relief, and maybe a little less confusion. i would like to propose the following format for the beginning of the panel. then i want to open it up for a lot of questions on the floor. i would like to propose our panelists talked about the situation right now, especially in syria. but what if scenarios, and their recommendation and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today have their year on the ground. y are constituencies there ar people whose opinions are sought. i would like to introduce a membe
. >> this is just an example. there are women all over the middle eave, yemen, tuknees yark egypt, they are using social media to show what is really going on there. so try to help mobilize others and to get attention to what the plight of women is. it is absolutely inappropriate that it could be taken down. i think it's back up now. >> greta: it is back up and facebook has apologized. but it ising about that the knee-jerk reaction to remove this picture because there were people where she was living that objected to an unveiled woman. they didn't want that on the facebook page. >> doesn't surprise me, having been in the middle east and saudi arabia and afghanistan and all sorts of places in africa, doesn't surprise me. but very disturbing that facebook would be willing to take it down. >> greta: it's hard to imaginer here, the education, women couldn't get educated. a 14-year-old pakistani girl was hotted in head for confronting pakistan on education. >> the war on women, women who are honor killed after they were raped. they can't go to school, leave their house, travel. this is when we should
-- the great pyramids in egypt. >> what you find in all of these sites endeavour to align structures to the rising of the sun at one or or several of those moments. storytelling in ancient times often involved reverence to the heavens and celestial bodies. >> there are more discoveries hidden in the culture, language, science, and temples we have yet to see. when we return, adam uncovers mysteries about the maya and why the obsession with december 21st. [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event is back, with the perfect vehicle that's just right for you, no matter which list you're on. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 c250 for $349 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. . >>> all of this beautiful architect you are looking at seven or eight percent what is out there. if those trees weren't there you would see 1,000 structures stretching almost a mile buried in the jungle. >> are there more mysteries still waiting to be discovered in the jungle? >> we have architectural excellence the longest hieroglyphics complex they look
population-wise in the region, egypt, and what it means for the mill east. >> health experts say there is a new report that shows too much exercise could be killing people. [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] woer what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relf ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. gives you a low $18.50 monthly plan premium... and select generic hypertension drugs available for only a penny... so you can focus on what really matters. call humana at 1-800-808-4003. he's going to apply testosterone to his underarm. axiron, the only underarm treatment for low t, can restore testosterone levels back to normal in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axiron can transfer to others through direct contact. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acn
saw this massive push in this really indigenous push within egypt, tunisia, and other democratic governments. some of those movements have had potentially scary things. there are some islamic fundamentalist parties that we do not have great relationships with and they understand that can be confusing thing. what obama has tried to do and in his famous speech in cairo is that he wants to deal with these countries and talk to the electorate. now we have an entirely different landscape, but in egypt, libya, and tunisia. relationship with these countries, these are countries with democratic governments. some of them have chosen paths that are a little more moderate, some leaning a little bit more to the fundamentalist side, but they're still fundamentally democratic and that will be a big challenge for the obama administration. host: its next for egypt? -- what is next for egypt? ?uest: in terms of ta host: the obama administration. guest: they still need to establish some of the legitimate government there. after the incredibly uplifting movements in it to rear square, it has devolv
interests. egypt has geographic asset. libya is a vague geographical expression between aaa ten ya in the northwest that has always been oriented toward greater carthage and tunisia and benghazi and others in the northeast which has been toward alexandria. iran has always been, because iran is natural as a state, it's developed rich institutions and bureaucracies over the centuries, and therefore it can project power. there will always be an iranian state. syria can collapse, libya can collapse. iran may go through regime change, but they'll always be a strong persian state. >> what does that tell you about u.s. policy toward iran? >> what it tells me is that our grand strategy has to be how do we engage in a dialogue with iran. what is the path toward that. is it fighting a war with them over nuclear weapons? is it not fighting a war with them? but the endgame is a dialogue with what is probably the most significant state in the middle east where we have a lot of interests to discuss. >> so the middle east you're describing is really one where the states that are real and enduring
but also in certain countries. look at northern africa and egypt, tunisia. they have studied these processes very intensely, and they know -- they have roughly 100,000 incidents of social unrest a year. >> what do we expect -- what are you expecting from the new leadership in terms of foreign policy? >> mostly a continuation of policies as we have seen the mayan past. china's major priority to stability in as regional environment but also globally. china needs stability in order to promote economic policies. >> thank you very much for coming in to talk with us. >> you are welcome. >> we will also have a look at the politically sensitive topic of rich and poor in china, a gap that has widened over the past 10 years, coming a little bit later in the program. moving on to syria -- "i am not a puppet, and i will live and die in syria," defiant words from syria's president. >> in an interview with the satellite broadcaster of russia today, assad about offers of safe passage to another country in exchange for leaving power. >> he warned that foreign intervention in syria would have
. meantime tony blair has told cnbc that egypt's role in the crisis is pivotal. >> i think the efforts of egypt and others to create a situation in which we can deescalate and stop it is essential. because if we don't assist israel retaliates, this will escalate and it could escalate in a very serious way indeed. >> joining us for more is david hartwell. david, just heard there from tony blair with regard to egy egypt's role. how has the rise of morsi transformed the issue compared where four years ago. >> charlie in gar son compariso can't rely perhaps on wholeheartedly as it did on mubarak to rein in thhamas. we're not sure how morsi will deal with the situation. egypt is under fresh frpressuree americans. but clearly we're still in a situation where egyptian foreign policy is still evolving. so we're not quite sure what the rule of the games are. >> are you surprised there hasn't been more of a reaction in the markets? >> not at this stage. hartwe'll comment about how it will play out is accurate because we don't know with respect to the new administration. but there is potentially
for a certain period of time. discussions are also reportedly under way about the possibility of getting egypt and the united states to establish a framework to monitor the truce. an israeli spokesperson has said his country wants talks to succeed. he says it is still prepared to send soldiers into gaza. a top hamas military commander is warning israel it will pay a heavy price if it launches a ground operation. people on both sides have spent more than a week in fear of another attack. they see warplanes in the sky, hear missiles screeching overhead, and they worry their homes will be hit next. nhk world reports on civilians caught up in the fighting. >> reporter: a siren went off to warn of an incoming rocket. in the town in southern israel. people immediately duck for cover. more than 1,000 rockets have been launched from gaza in the past seven days and retaliation for israeli air strikes. the israeli army has developed a new anti-missile system. it has intercepted many attacks but the area i can cover is limited. it's impossible to shoot down all the rockets. this is the house in israel di
reaffirmed egypt's commitment to the palestinian cause and a need for just resolution. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton helped negotiate the deal. she promised to work with partners in the region. the israeli military killed about 160 palestinians during the conflict. palestinian militants fired rockets from the gaza strip that killed five israelis. prime minister netanyahu said the right thing is to reach a lasting cease-fire but he warned of a wider military operation if security was threatened. hamas leader mashau warned his forces would resume attacks if israel broke the truce. >>> people in jerusalem are wondering if the cease-fire will hold. cohey sue gee has covered the middle east for years. he was in gaza on the first day of the offensive. kohei, why did the two sides agree to this truce? >> reporter: well, thousands of rockets have been fired since israeli forces withdrew from gaza in 2005. the israelis seemed to have come to the conclusion that they succeed the in reducing the ability of hamas to attack. and i think the influence of the u.s. contributed to bringing a
to egypt today where he would appeal personally for deescalating the violence. why did he go to egypt? after ousting hosni mo bark, negotiations are going on as we speak and i hope we will reach something soon that will stop the violence and counterviolence. the whole world is working on trying to deescalate this conflict. the european union weighed in today as did russia. russia preparing a u.n. resolution calling for a cease fire. probably our closest ally abroad in matters of war and peace is britain, and they are taking the same line as president obama, although they are being even more direct about it. the foreign secretary saying that hamas bares responsibility for what's going on, but he warns that "a ground invasion of gaza would lose israel a lot of the international support they have in this situation." a ground invasion is more difficult for the international community to sympathize with or support. so the world, at least the world of the united states and our allies is pretty much speaking with one voice here. israel, stop the ground work thing. that's the message from the
aligned to the sun besides the ones here including stonehedge in england. the great pyramids in egypt and the temple that anchor watt in cambodia. >> what you find in all of these sites is an endeavor to align structures to the rising of the sun at one or another or several of those moments. story telling in ancient times often involve reference to the heavens and to celestial bodies. that's what the myian weichiga mayan were doing. >> there are other hidden treasures in tem fells vewe haven't seen. adam housley uncovers mysteries of the maya and why the exception with december 21st. [ male announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multi-vitamin designed for men's health concerns as we age. it has more of 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day men's 50+. a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcare. with this plan, you can get copays as low as a dollar through a preferred network pharmacy like walgreens -- where you'll find 8,000 convenient loca
will not willfully step aside as we saw in tunisia, egypt and even in yemen. and i would argue probably is not amenable to any sort of negotiated solution. the second constant is that the opposition has been perpetually divided, fragmented, unable to coalesce around a unifying vision of a post-assad syria. we've seen divisions among the external opposition, we've seen divisions inside syria, we've seen divisions among the arms groups, divisions based on ideology, divisions based on patrons and so forth. and the third factor is that the international community has remained at a stalemate, has been unable to reach a consensus on how to move forward in syria. we've seen three security council vetoes by russia and china causing many to call the u.n., essentially, ineffective in this crisis. so it's been the interplay of these three factors, i would argue, that has led syria down the path that it has taken. in terms of u.s. policy, u.s. policy is based on the objective of having assad, as president obama called for, step aside. this was back in august of 2011. the problem with u.s. policy is
leadership's be it in egypt or turkey, and it's probably the move to undermind the palestinian authority because he's going to the united nations asking for the status of the states, observer state, but the change of subject, at least by the israelis away from iran and syria, on to gaza, to me, is a very fascinating development. is it temporary or going to be an ongoing -- how long is that change of subject? sometimes leaders and security people know better. they feel they could have contained escalation. maybe that's what they have in mind. is it doable? does it work in this part of the region we live in? the third promise president obama made, again, never made any commitments to syria on syria except on the chemical weapons. now, we understand right now that, you know, there's concern there was a suggestion of a need of 70 # ,000 troops in order to secure the chemical facilities in syria in case there's any suspicious movement, be it by, you know, helping, you know, by the jihadists taking over or the regime using these chemical weapons. i mean, this is a big promise as well. what pre
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